LAVA

Lava

Born and raised in Hawaii, photographer Tom Kualii has always loved creativity and expressing what he sees through art. However, it wasn’t until he was deployed to Iraq that he began to discover his fascination with the world of photography. During his time there, he captured the atmosphere of beauty set within a world of chaotic war and thus began his love for the camera.

Upon return to his home town, Kualii continued to advance his skills in photography and has since turned his passion to what he calls “the theatre that is Kalapana; The vast playground of the Hawaiian Goddess, Pele.” According to Hawaiian religion, Pele is the goddess of fire, lighting, wind, and volcanoes, and she is known for her creative passion and profound love.

Kualii enjoys taking extreme risks and finding great adventure through his visual exploration of Hawaii and, through that process, he also finds a connection to his Hawaiian roots. He says, “The Big Island is a treasury of extremes, ranging from lush windward tropical forests to soaring volcanic peaks, from the plains of Waimea, to the cliff-walled valley of Waipo; from the lunar desolation of Ka’u, to the ancient settlements of Kona, Kohala and Puna, the Big Island covers it all, and I cover the Big Island.”

By Katie Hosmer

lava2

lava3

lava4

lava5

lava6

More on www.500px.com/tomkualii

Life as cinema NY

yee

Having traveled everywhere from England and Norway to Iceland and Chile, artist and photographer D. Yee sees life’s cinematic moments wherever he goes. His photos are filled with emotionally powerful scenes but it’s all done in such a way that you never feel as though someone is directing.

I got in touch with Yee to ask him more about the series which he calls Life as Cinema. Here is how he explains it. “The inspiration behind Life as Cinema is a combination of many things. From my beginning start of street photography to fine art and photo journalism of human life and society. My perpetual attraction to the human condition. Ugly, beautiful.

“While Life as Cinema is an ongoing series without an end (yet), there are chapters. The present chapter are of human life in unexpected fleeting moments in places foreign or now forgotten to me. The series takes on its own direction organically – like life – as I go on. Like life, or most of it, I have very little control over what I photograph. The only dictation in the series is how I select an image for it – like a movie director editing. I am always looking for that subtle feeling or look of a production still. What I do not control or cannot predict is how Life as Cinema will end.”

yee2

yee3

yee4

yee5

yee6

more on: www.d-yee.com

Kate Moss by Mario Testino

Kiss me, Kate! Mario Testino’s tribute to his greatest muse

Mario Testino is recognised as the ultimate fashion photographer of his generation but his pictures of Kate Moss transcend fashion. The consequence of  two decades of extraordinary friendship, and phenomenal glamour, this iconic collaboration is an intimate insight into the lives and minds of  two of the world’s definitive style leaders.

Mario says “I met Kate very early on. Shortly after her first Galliano show I went backstage to congratulate her, only to find her crying: she was disappointed that she had only been given one outfit to model in the show. My answer to her was this: ‘In life there are perfumes and colognes. You need to use lots of cologne as the scent fades away; with a perfume you just use a drop and it lasts all night. You are a perfume, you will go on and on.’ Little did I know just how true that would become! And that I had made a friend for life.”

In a rare glimpse into the mind of one of the industry’s most private figures, Kate Moss also gives her insights into her life with the celebrated photographer, expanding on both their professional and personal relationship.

“Mario took me to a new level of glamour. I don’t think anybody had seen me as any kind of sexy model before he did. He was the one that transformed me. Before him I was just a grungy girl, but he saw me differently. He was the first to say ‘Oh, she’s quite sexy. I’ve seen her out! I know she’s not just that grungy girl.’ He’d seen me in a pair of heels, getting glamorous – and he was the first to start taking pictures of me in that way. He changed the way people thought about me as a model, for sure. Later other people started working with me in that way, but he was the first.”

This book catalogues the journey of one of fashion’s most creative collaborations, from early days backstage at the shows to behind-the-scenes glimpses of the ground-breaking editorials they continue to produce for the world’s most respected magazines. Many photographs have been chosen from Testino’s private archive and arepublished here for the first time.

Kate concludes, “People are really enthralled by Mario, when they meet him he’s so giving and generous with himself, it’s never just about him. He always gives so much of himself – he’ll teach people, he’ll help people, he’s really sensitive to people and who they are. When he walks in a room it’s like a light has been turned on. He has passion and energy and vibrancy and all those things that make a person a superstar really.”

This book is Mario’s personal homage to his greatest muse: a young girl that captured his heart and eye with her beauty, humour and spirit, and whose image in his photographs has captured imaginations the world over.

Contents include:

  • Foreword by Mario Testino
  • Exclusive essay by Kate Moss
  • Over 100 images in black-and-white and colour, including many unseen private photographs
  • Boxed hardback special edition – limited run of 1,500 signed copies
The photographer:
Peruvian-born Mario Testino travels extensively shooting for Vanity Fair, American, British, and French Vogue. Other clients include Burberry, Versace, Dolce & Gabbana and Michael Kors. His solo exhibitions have shown in galleries worldwide, and his work is held in the permanent collections of the National Portrait Gallery and V&A Museum in London, and others.
By TASCHEN.

AL MERCATO – MILAN

From their kitchen at the restaurant Al Mercato (16, Via Sant’Eufemia – Milan)Beniamino Nespor and Eugenio Roncoroni serve food that is both contemporary and steeped in tradition. It happens to be extremely exciting too. Among their sources of inspiration they mention Thomas Keller, Alain Ducasse and Marco Pierre White, and their technique is indeed rigorous, but their flavors draw from contemporary American gastronomy, with dashes of South East Asia. This shouldn’t come as a surprise seeing that the guys – former schoolmates – traveled the world before settling back in their hometown. Both the “Ristorante” and at the more informal “Burger Bar” (two sides of the same establishment) boast a curated selection of sophisticated and not at all obvious ingredients in odd pairings that manage to come together very well. We recommend thepulled pork sandwich (served on an impeccable bun with a homemade bbq sauce that is to die for), the noodle soup(but it’s really a version of Vietnamese “Pho”), the oven baked marrow on toasted bread. Anything with duck tongue and pidgeon, really: they know how to do them justice. Next on their agenda? A noodle bar operating til 3am. We look forward to that, especially seeing how poor the choice is for “night owl gourmands” in Milan.

By Laura Lazzaroni

 

Century of the Child: Growing by Design, 1900–2000

July 29–November 5, 2012

MoMA’s ambitious survey of 20th century design for children is the first large-scale overview of the modernist preoccupation with children and childhood as a paradigm for progressive design thinking. The exhibition will bring together areas underrepresented in design history and often considered separately, including school architecture, clothing, playgrounds, toys and games, children’s hospitals and safety equipment, nurseries, furniture, and books.

In 1900, Swedish design reformer and social theorist Ellen Key’s book Century of the Child presaged the 20th century as a period of intensified focus and progressive thinking regarding the rights, development, and well-being of children as interests of utmost importance to all society. Taking inspiration from Key—and looking back through the 20th century 100 years after her forecast—this exhibition will examine individual and collective visions for the material world of children, from utopian dreams for the “citizens of the future” to the dark realities of political conflict and exploitation. In this period children have been central to the concerns, ambitions, and activities of modern architects and designers both famous and unsung, and working specifically for children has often provided unique freedom and creativity to the avant-garde…….

http://www.moma.org/visit/calendar/exhibitions/1239

Squish Studio – CANADA

Tilting, Fogo Island, Newfoundland

SAUNDERS ARCHITECTURE

The Squish Studio is located just outside the small town of Tilting on the eastern end of Fogo Island. First settled in the mid-18th century, Tilting is known for its strong Irish culture and its recent designation by Parks Canada as a National Cul- tural Landscape District of Canada.

The Squish Studio’s white angular form, sited on a rocky strip of coastline, that could rival Italy’s western coast, offers sharp contrast to the traditional vernacular architecture of the nearby picturesque community of Tilting. As its architect, Todd Saunders, has commented on the studio’s siting, “…it is out of sight, but close.” The approach to the front entry of the studio is dramatic, as the most southern end of the studio rises twenty feet above the ground, in sharp contrast to its most northern tip that measures only half that dimension. The compact, trapezi- um-shaped plan of the studio is augmented by the extension of the east and west exterior walls to create a sheltered, triangulated south entry deck and a north terrace that overlooks the ocean. From a distant view, the streamlined form of the Squish Studio becomes apparent with its high back and low (squished) front designed, in part, to deflect the winds from the stormy North Atlantic.

As we approach the entry of the studio we are greeted by Silke Otto-Knapp, a London-based artist and the first occupant of the Squish Studio. As Silke brings us through the studio, the spatial compression of the tall and narrow entry area gives way to the horizontal expanse of the main room. The downward angled roof leads the eye to the full height oblong glass window focused on a splendid view of Round Head. The vertical white planks that line the interior walls are interrupted by a playful series of narrow windows integrated with an expanse of built-in cabi- netry.

Silke’s quick figurative studies on paper are posted on the walls, as well as, several large scale canvasses. She is delighted to work in such an architecturally inspired space, especially when it is stormy and she can experience the imme- diacy of the sea and, on some days, observe the dramatic shift of the island’s weather.

The Squish Studio, like most of its other counterparts, is equipped with a compost toilet, a small kitchenette and wood-burning stove. Power is supplied by stand- alone solar panels, mounted on an adjacent hilltop. Both the interior and exterior of the studio, including the roof, is clad with spruce planks that are painted white. At night, the studio, illuminated by the soft glow of its solar-powered lighting, appears as a lantern or a lighthouse placed strategically on a rocky cliff to over- look the North Atlantic. In its isolation, one can also imagine a sole occupant, vulnerable but protected from the elements – inspired to work late into the night, occasionally distracted by the crash of the waves, or perhaps, fully immersed in the work at hand, the first glimpse of the sunrise through the Squish Studio’s slot windows that face the north-eastern horizon.

How we made – Graham Coxon and Stephen Street on Parklife by Blur

Graham Coxon, guitarist

Modern Life Is Rubbish [Blur’s second album] was overlooked because of the rise of grunge, but we were halfway to somewhere, and with Parklife we arrived. The album was the convergence of a lot of influences: Alex [James, bassist] wanted to be in Duran Duran, I wanted to be in Wire, and Damon [Albarn] wanted to be … I don’t know. There were songs on the album we were excited about, but I was surprised it got so many awards. One or two would have been all right.

A lot of people thought it was a celebration of Englishness, but it was actually very sarcastic. The Parklife single wasn’t about the working class, it was about the park class: dustbin men, pigeons, joggers – things we saw every day on the way to the studio [Maison Rouge in Fulham]. It epitomises what Blur were about – having fun and doing exactly what you want to do.

But Damon wasn’t comfortable doing the verses – he just couldn’t get into character. He thought it would be better to get in a celebrity, so I suggested the actor Phil Daniels because we were big fans from Quadrophenia. At the line “There was a piece of my heart”, Phil said, “Should I drop the ‘h’? If I pronounce it, it’ll sound more adorable.” We didn’t want to use a forced mockney accent, so he pronounced the “h”.

I play a bit of the German national anthem on saxophone in the “vorsprung durch technik” line. It’s a very comedic song, a knees-up. Oasis were accused of being Chas’n’Dave, but we weren’t far away ourselves.

Stephen Street, producer

Modern Life hadn’t been a commercial success, but the band were still drawing a big touring crowd so the fear of being dropped had gone. We went into the studio to do Parklife soon after.

Damon was directing his attention to a very English kind of inspiration: great records made by the Kinks, and also imaginary characters like Tracy Jacks[Albarn’s civil servant in the throes of a midlife crisis]. The album was made piecemeal: we did a few songs, then they were on the road again, then back in the studio. There were no arguments.

The style of [first single] Girls & Boys was unlike anything Blur had done before, but I thought it would be Top 5 – it was so downright basic. I felt the way I had when I produced the Smiths: that as long as Morrissey was singing on it, it would be the Smiths. It was the same with Blur: they could put their hands to anything, and it would still sound like Blur.

Each song had its own sound and direction: End of a Century is completely different from Girls & Boys, and different again from Bank Holiday. I knew [the song] Parklife would connect with people, and I still often hear it played at Loftus Road [Queens Park Rangers’ ground]. In fact, a lot of football teams play it.

Phil Daniels was first approached to recite a poem over a song called The Debt Collector, but in the end it became an instrumental because Damon couldn’t come up with a poem he liked. So we decided Phil should have a go at Parklife instead. The band and I were already pretty sick of that song, but he invigorated it and we were interested again – although personally, it’s still not one of my favourites.

Interviews by Caroline Sullivan. guardian.co.uk