Kaffeine Café by DesignLSM – London

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DesignLSM have recently completed the interiors for a second outlet for Kaffeine, based in Eastcastle Street W1.

Kaffeine is an independent Australian / New Zealand owned café delivering high standards in service, food, coffee and décor.

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Kaffeine

Pukeko Coffee

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Pukeko Coffee – Oxford, England.

Near the city centre, at a really busy part of town traffic-wise (all day and night) sits an unsuspecting surprise. Seemingly out of place, serving like a vendor is a New Zealander with a cart (a three-wheeled vespa) probably smaller than most people’s first car. This is a fantastic idea in theory as many students and lecturers would pass him by to get to their university classes. Wholeheartedly, it is absolutely worth it.

chris pig – London

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I’ve been printmaking almost ever since I can remember; I made my first etching plate when I was about fourteen or fifteen and little else has interested me ever since. Since childhood as well, I have been interested in representing the world around me; specifically narrative situations that sum up the human condition.My work vacillates between these narrative images and those that are devoid of narrative and concerned with aesthetics.

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by Chris Pig

http://www.chrispig.com/

Kate Moss by Mario Testino

Kiss me, Kate! Mario Testino’s tribute to his greatest muse

Mario Testino is recognised as the ultimate fashion photographer of his generation but his pictures of Kate Moss transcend fashion. The consequence of  two decades of extraordinary friendship, and phenomenal glamour, this iconic collaboration is an intimate insight into the lives and minds of  two of the world’s definitive style leaders.

Mario says “I met Kate very early on. Shortly after her first Galliano show I went backstage to congratulate her, only to find her crying: she was disappointed that she had only been given one outfit to model in the show. My answer to her was this: ‘In life there are perfumes and colognes. You need to use lots of cologne as the scent fades away; with a perfume you just use a drop and it lasts all night. You are a perfume, you will go on and on.’ Little did I know just how true that would become! And that I had made a friend for life.”

In a rare glimpse into the mind of one of the industry’s most private figures, Kate Moss also gives her insights into her life with the celebrated photographer, expanding on both their professional and personal relationship.

“Mario took me to a new level of glamour. I don’t think anybody had seen me as any kind of sexy model before he did. He was the one that transformed me. Before him I was just a grungy girl, but he saw me differently. He was the first to say ‘Oh, she’s quite sexy. I’ve seen her out! I know she’s not just that grungy girl.’ He’d seen me in a pair of heels, getting glamorous – and he was the first to start taking pictures of me in that way. He changed the way people thought about me as a model, for sure. Later other people started working with me in that way, but he was the first.”

This book catalogues the journey of one of fashion’s most creative collaborations, from early days backstage at the shows to behind-the-scenes glimpses of the ground-breaking editorials they continue to produce for the world’s most respected magazines. Many photographs have been chosen from Testino’s private archive and arepublished here for the first time.

Kate concludes, “People are really enthralled by Mario, when they meet him he’s so giving and generous with himself, it’s never just about him. He always gives so much of himself – he’ll teach people, he’ll help people, he’s really sensitive to people and who they are. When he walks in a room it’s like a light has been turned on. He has passion and energy and vibrancy and all those things that make a person a superstar really.”

This book is Mario’s personal homage to his greatest muse: a young girl that captured his heart and eye with her beauty, humour and spirit, and whose image in his photographs has captured imaginations the world over.

Contents include:

  • Foreword by Mario Testino
  • Exclusive essay by Kate Moss
  • Over 100 images in black-and-white and colour, including many unseen private photographs
  • Boxed hardback special edition – limited run of 1,500 signed copies
The photographer:
Peruvian-born Mario Testino travels extensively shooting for Vanity Fair, American, British, and French Vogue. Other clients include Burberry, Versace, Dolce & Gabbana and Michael Kors. His solo exhibitions have shown in galleries worldwide, and his work is held in the permanent collections of the National Portrait Gallery and V&A Museum in London, and others.
By TASCHEN.

How to cook perfect hash browns

If a potato has any place at all on the breakfast table, surely it must be in the form of butter-golden, crispy yet fluffy, hot hash browns

I’ve spent the last fortnight in the United States. Yellow grits, blueberry pancakes, biscuits and gravy – I managed to tick off most of the breakfast items in the I-Spy book of American cliches, but to my disappointment, not a single one came with hash browns. I’d hoped to return home an expert, but my principal experience of hash browns remains the crunchy orange triangles traditionally served with spaghetti hoops at school. These, however, were certainly preferable to the greasy, floppy rosti-like creations I ate in Chicago a few years ago – and neither, I’d hope, are representative of the true glory of the hash brown.

I lugged three large American cookbooks back in my suitcase, but only one had a recipe for hash browns, and that, in the 75th anniversary edition of the classic Joy of Cooking, sounded remarkably like a rosti. Panicked, I wondered whether they were in fact different names for the same dish, but the Oxford Companion to Food reassured me that hash browns are “small rissole-like cakes of cooked and finely chopped potato” in the fine tradition of American hashes rather than the cakes cooked from raw or parboiled potato favoured in Switzerland.

Hashes, the American equivalent of British bubble and squeak, have always been a favourite way of using up motley leftovers, so this makes sense. Hash, of course, comes from the French verb hacher, to chop up, which suggests the spuds should be cut up and, of course, browned rather than just heated through. But apart from these clues, I’m going into this challenge somewhat blind. According to the various recipes, hash browns can be anything from a loose collection of crunchy fried potato chunks, often labelled as “breakfastpotatoes” on the menus I came across, to crunchy, latke-like potato pancakes – but which fits the breakfast bill best?

Unless you’re a cattle rancher they may not fit the bill on a Thursday morning before work, but crisp, buttery hash browns are well worth the effort on a lazy Saturday morning. Serve with a poached egg, and then go out for a long walk before lunch.

Serves 2-3

500g floury potatoes, scrubbed and cut into large chunks
35g butter or 25g bacon drippings
½ onion, thinly sliced

1. Put the potatoes in a large pan of cold, salted water and bring to the boil. Simmer until tender, then drain well and set aside to cool and dry out completely.

2. If using butter, clarify it by putting it in a small pan over a medium heat and skimming off the foam that rises to the top. When it stops bubbling, pour it through a fine sieve or cheesecloth to strain off any solids, then set aside until ready to use.

3. Heat a small heavy-based frying pan on a medium heat, and add half the butter or dripping. Cook the onion until soft and golden. Meanwhile, finely chop the cooked and cooled potatoes and season well.

4. Turn up the heat to medium-high and add the potatoes to the pan in one layer, stirring to incorporate the onions. Push down to make a cake, then cook for about 15 minutes until crisp and well browned on the bottom, then tip on to a plate and add the rest of the butter or dripping to the pan. Slide the hash brown back into the pan, browned side up, and cook for about another 10 minutes, then cut in half and serve.

Are hash browns the best kind of breakfast potato, or do you prefer tattie scones or country fries – indeed, does a potato have any place on the breakfast table at all? Do you yearn for the crunchy, orange cafeteria variety, and if so, does anyone have any suggestions about how to recreate those guilty pleasures from scratch?

By Felicity Cloake

How we made – Graham Coxon and Stephen Street on Parklife by Blur

Graham Coxon, guitarist

Modern Life Is Rubbish [Blur’s second album] was overlooked because of the rise of grunge, but we were halfway to somewhere, and with Parklife we arrived. The album was the convergence of a lot of influences: Alex [James, bassist] wanted to be in Duran Duran, I wanted to be in Wire, and Damon [Albarn] wanted to be … I don’t know. There were songs on the album we were excited about, but I was surprised it got so many awards. One or two would have been all right.

A lot of people thought it was a celebration of Englishness, but it was actually very sarcastic. The Parklife single wasn’t about the working class, it was about the park class: dustbin men, pigeons, joggers – things we saw every day on the way to the studio [Maison Rouge in Fulham]. It epitomises what Blur were about – having fun and doing exactly what you want to do.

But Damon wasn’t comfortable doing the verses – he just couldn’t get into character. He thought it would be better to get in a celebrity, so I suggested the actor Phil Daniels because we were big fans from Quadrophenia. At the line “There was a piece of my heart”, Phil said, “Should I drop the ‘h’? If I pronounce it, it’ll sound more adorable.” We didn’t want to use a forced mockney accent, so he pronounced the “h”.

I play a bit of the German national anthem on saxophone in the “vorsprung durch technik” line. It’s a very comedic song, a knees-up. Oasis were accused of being Chas’n’Dave, but we weren’t far away ourselves.

Stephen Street, producer

Modern Life hadn’t been a commercial success, but the band were still drawing a big touring crowd so the fear of being dropped had gone. We went into the studio to do Parklife soon after.

Damon was directing his attention to a very English kind of inspiration: great records made by the Kinks, and also imaginary characters like Tracy Jacks[Albarn’s civil servant in the throes of a midlife crisis]. The album was made piecemeal: we did a few songs, then they were on the road again, then back in the studio. There were no arguments.

The style of [first single] Girls & Boys was unlike anything Blur had done before, but I thought it would be Top 5 – it was so downright basic. I felt the way I had when I produced the Smiths: that as long as Morrissey was singing on it, it would be the Smiths. It was the same with Blur: they could put their hands to anything, and it would still sound like Blur.

Each song had its own sound and direction: End of a Century is completely different from Girls & Boys, and different again from Bank Holiday. I knew [the song] Parklife would connect with people, and I still often hear it played at Loftus Road [Queens Park Rangers’ ground]. In fact, a lot of football teams play it.

Phil Daniels was first approached to recite a poem over a song called The Debt Collector, but in the end it became an instrumental because Damon couldn’t come up with a poem he liked. So we decided Phil should have a go at Parklife instead. The band and I were already pretty sick of that song, but he invigorated it and we were interested again – although personally, it’s still not one of my favourites.

Interviews by Caroline Sullivan. guardian.co.uk

Anish Kapoor – LONDON

Orbit, 2009-2012
115 m
Project for the London Olympics 2012
Collaboration with Cecil Balmond, Arup AGU

Award winning London-based artist Anish Kapoor has been given the commission of a lifetime to design the spectacular new public attraction in the Olympic Park. The stunning artwork, to be entitled ‘The ArcelorMittal Orbit’, will ensure the Park remains an unrivalled visitor destination following the 2012 Games, providing the key Olympic legacy Mayor of London Boris Johnson envisaged for the East End.

The breathtaking sculpture – thought to be the tallest in the UK – will consist of a continuous looping lattice of tubular steel. Standing at a gigantic 115m, it will be 22m taller than the Statue of Liberty in New York and offer unparalleled views of the entire 250 acres of the Olympic Park and London’s skyline from a special viewing platform. Visitors will be able to take a trip up the statuesque structure in a huge lift and will have the option of walking down the spiralling staircase.

Anish Kapoor’s proposal has been developed in collaboration with one of the world’s leading structural designers, Cecil Balmond of Arup. Balmond, who trained and lives in London, is known for his innovative work on some of the greatest contemporary buildings in the world, such as the CCTV building in Beijing, as well as numerous Serpentine Gallery pavilion commissions. The two began working together on the Marsyas project in 2002 and have become renowned for their ambitious, large-scale public art projects

DODD – London

SPRING SUMMER 12 LOOKBOOK SHOT BY JAKE GREEN

“We recently paired up with Jake Green to shoot Dodd’s S/S12 lookbook. Here are some select images from the shoot, watch out for a video to come in the near future.”

Dodd is a London based menswear brand. All clothing is designed in house and we manufacture all of our product in England. Although nothing new we feel this is incredibly important to our identity and it doesn’t mean just sewing in the label.

Launched in late 2011 the initial collection was a small eight piece capsule which we hope was malleable enough to create a number of different looks which is how we prefer to design. We are now in our second season which is this Spring/Summer and is slightly larger.

http://www.doddclothing.com

The Stone Roses Return °

So there we were on Wednesday May 23, about to finish our gargantuan quiz issue, when someone yelled from across the room: “The Stone Roses are playing, TONIGHT, in Warrington.” First came the panic. Then came the excitement. Then came the planning. We, and hundreds of thousands of people across the world, had been waiting for this moment for 16 years. It had to go on the cover. It had to. This week’s issue was supposed to be all about the World’s Greatest Music Quiz. But now it’s all about the World’s Greatest Music Quiz, and the world’s most exciting comeback. It’s a double issue, for the price of one.

BY: http://www.nme.com/magazine